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Thread: A History of Assassin's Creed

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    Default A History of Assassin's Creed

    How Assassin's Creed rose to become one of the landmark gaming franchises

    Assassin's Creed has now become an annual highlight of the gaming calendar, with Ubisoft Montreal producing an always excellent yearly instalment in the ongoing story of the ancient war between the order of Assassins and the Templars.


    Mixing sci-fi, stealth, free-running, action, brutal combat, amazing open world historical settings and a overwhelming feel for epic history, the AC series has gone from strength to strength. Yet when the original Assassin's Creed debuted in 2007, the success of the blockbuster franchise looked anything but certain.

    So how did Assassin's Creed come to stab its way to success and become one of the landmark gaming series? To find out, we take a retrospective look at AC's most important games as well as peering deep into the Animus to see if Revelations can live up to its name and what the future of the series may hold. Naturally there will be spoilers, oh yes.


    Assassin's Creed
    The original Assassin's Creed mixed sci-fi and historical adventure to introduce an ages-old conflict between the Assassins and Templars which has run throughout the course of history to the present day. Held by the sinister (is there any other kind?) Abstergo corporation, innocuous barman Desmond Miles was forced to enter the Animus and explore the memories of his assassin ancestor AltaÔr ibn-La'Ahad.

    Charged with retrieving an ancient artefact known as The Piece of Eden and restoring harmony to the Holy Land, Altair tracks down and kills nine Templar targets on both Saracen and Crusader sides before facing their apparent leader Robert de Sable. However his own mentor, Al Mualim is revealed as the secret tenth Templar and Altair faces him down in a climactic duel at the assassin stronghold of Maysaf, before hurtling back to the present day as a puzzled and still very captive Desmond.

    Anticipation for Assassin's Creed had been high following an intriguing build up campaign, but on release its detractors gave it a hard time for its inconsistent and occasionally annoying stealth system and somewhat repetitive structure. Yet for fans, the original AC's many joys outweighed its imperfections and also offered a tantalising glimpse of the series' real potential.

    AC laid the foundations for many of the AC systems we take for granted today with key elements like the beautifully realised cityscapes, fluid Parkour based free-roaming, visceral crunching combat and huge set piece assassinations. Climbing your first viewpoint, performing a leap of Faith or just sprinting around Jerusalem, Acre and Damascus, baiting guards and causing havoc, all these and those mysterious eagle vision glyphs in Desmond's cell, still bring back golden gameplay memories.

    While the original Assassin's Creed was a flawed gem, it was still a gem nonetheless and to find out why, see our original Assassin's Creed review for the full story.

    Assassin's Creed II
    If the original AC was an appetiser, then Assassin's Creed II was the main feast with all the trimmings, dessert, coffee, cheese and biscuits and a swift nightcap to follow. Ubi Soft Montreal not only addressed AC's shortcomings, but built in new and innovative gameplay, improved stealth and combat, opened up a complex and beautiful medieval world, while adding much deeper character progression. Now you could enjoy a vast variety of missions and a compelling Renaissance storyline which encompassed the glories of Florence, Venice and the Vatican City.

    Busted out of Abstergo by accomplice Lucy, Desmond went on the run with new Assassins associates Shaun and Rebecca and delved back into the Animus mark 2.0, to take on the mantle of Italian nobleman and watershed series hero, Ezio Auditore de Ferenze. Pitted against the might of Templar pope Cesare Borgia, Ezio allies with the cunning NiccolÚ Machiavelli and the inventive Leonardo Da Vinci, to win through a dark labyrinthine plot, recover two more lost pieces of Eden and become the prophet and leader of the Assassin order during the middle ages.

    AC II was also full stand out gaming moments: haring through the countryside on a wild carriage ride, soaring over the rooftops in Leonardo's flying machine, acquiring your hidden pistol, a one-man vendetta on roaming minstrels or swooping through the majestic Assassin's tombs, AC II remains perhaps our favourite title of an impressive series. Two DLC expansions, The Battle of Forli and Bonfire of the Vanities extended the story even further.

    Still amongst the handful of full 1000 complete GamerScores we possess, AC II was truly light years ahead of its predecessor, set a new standard in what sequels should achieve and also gave us in Ezio, one of 21st century gaming's truly iconic characters. To learn the full story on why AC II was such a triumph, Leap of Faith on over to Assassin's Creed II review for the full story.


    Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood
    Brotherhood took the AC series in a new and intriguing direction, with Ezio now a master assassin and able to recruit new agents and assassins - the brotherhood of the title - to his cause. More strategic than previous games, Brotherhood dug beneath the surface of the ancient Templar Assassin feud, with Ezio dispatching assassin agents across Europe, while simultaneously battling the Borgias for control of the eternal city.

    After a night of wild passion with Caterina Sforza (well here's hoping), Ezio awoke to find his villa at Monteriggioni besieged by the Borgia horde. After his uncle Mario was killed and the Apple of Eden fell into the hands of Cesare Borgia, Ezio escaped to Rome where he set about wreaking a terrible revenge on its Borgia overlords. While both Rodrigo and Cesare were eventually put to the historical sword, Desmond used the Apple of Eden to open up the Temple, a gateway to the other Eden artefacts. But the game concluded on a proper cliffhanger with Desmond forced to stab Lucy, while under the control of the enigmatic being known as Juno.

    Re-inventing, refining and streamlining, Brotherhood's main success was to really gave you a feel of being in control of an Assassin clan, training them up and even calling on their help in- game. The sandbox was bigger (Rome being about three times larger than any previous city in the series), more bewitching, more inventive and the mechanic of capturing Borgia Towers to extend your control over the city adding an entertaining strategic element.

    Combat was more attacking, frequently on horseback and stand out moments included rumbling around in Leonardo's tank, the Romulus mission's gravity defying platforming and of course for the very first time, a very decent multiplayer component. For the full story on joining the Brotherhood see our Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood review

    Assassin's Creed: Revelations
    Set to swing into action this November, AC: Revelations promises to be exactly that, a complete revelation, laying bare the truth behind the medieval conflict, unifying and the stories of Desmond, Ezio and Altair, wiping the slate clean and paving the way for Assassin's Creed III.

    Revelations' action will transfer to the jewel of the east, the crossroads of Constantinople, where Ezio will seek five keys hidden by Altair centuries previously which will ultimately reveal an artefact capable of ending the eternal war between Assassins and Templars, saving the world and repairing the shattered mind of the unfortunate Desmond.

    New features include the Ottoman assassins' hook blade, which speeds up travel by around 30%, allowing you to zip line around the city, new bomb crafting abilities, an innovative Assassins Den tower defence mechanic and even deeper and more compelling multiplayer experience.

    Yet splendid as all those new gameplay bells and whistles sound, what we're really most looking forward to is seeing the tales of Ezio, Desmond and AltaÔr conclude, as all the loose ends are tied up, the disparate plot threads explained and everything resolved in one climactic, cataclysmic, conclusion. Quite simply, we cannot wait. For all the latest check out our complete Assassin's Creed: Revelations game hub

    Could you unlock the very secrets of the animus itself? Then why not check our amazing Unlock the Animus competition to win a trip to the historic city of Istanbul where Assassin's Creed: Revelations takes place.

    If you are victorious you will receive a fantastic trip to Istanbul for yourself and a friend, including flights, four nights of hotel accommodation and £500 spending money and a chance to tour the beautiful and historic Constantinople of the Roman, Byzantine, and Ottoman periods. Good luck!


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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    i havent played the games yet but story gulo poray idea paylam.... But AC 1 er character to 2 er charater er shatay mil nai, tai na? O_o

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Quote Originally Posted by Orno101 View Post
    i havent played the games yet but story gulo poray idea paylam.... But AC 1 er character to 2 er charater er shatay mil nai, tai na? O_o
    Dude you didn't played any Assassin's Creed!!!!!!!!!!!
    I think you should suicide right now...............

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    Quote Originally Posted by anik_lc View Post
    Dude you didn't played any Assassin's Creed!!!!!!!!!!! I think you should suicide right now...............
    Lol! Bro amr laptop a support koray na...And i m goin to buy a pc this jan so tokhon khelbo Ok bro i have a qstn... Amr lptop er graphics gma x4500 nd ram 1916....AC 1 launcher a dekhai ram er pashay akta x... Graphics, cpu, shader all fine.... Ram ta 4 gb korlay ki play kortay parbo??Cod4 smoothly cholay nd mw2 ta aktu lag koray... note: at low

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Quote Originally Posted by Orno101 View Post
    Lol! Bro amr laptop a support koray na...And i m goin to buy a pc this jan so tokhon khelbo Ok bro i have a qstn... Amr lptop er graphics gma x4500 nd ram 1916....AC 1 launcher a dekhai ram er pashay akta x... Graphics, cpu, shader all fine.... Ram ta 4 gb korlay ki play kortay parbo??Cod4 smoothly cholay nd mw2 ta aktu lag koray... note: at low
    Amartao to built in X4500 ache G41 er shathe. Ami to AC1 smoothly khele shesh korsi with 2GB RAM. Ar AC II ar ACB shesh korsi ei built in diyei but onek lag hoito. 4GB Ram holeu maybe ei rokom e slow cholbe. So ei game 2ta GPU niye khelai better.
    AC 1 to cholar kotha 1GB RAM ei. Ami to Win XP diye khelsi. Pagefile bariye dekho ektu.

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    anik bhaiya amr ram to 2 gbr o kom.... I dwnldd a fresh copy but no luck... Shall i buy a 4gb stick??

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Quote Originally Posted by Orno101 View Post
    anik bhaiya amr ram to 2 gbr o kom.... I dwnldd a fresh copy but no luck... Shall i buy a 4gb stick??
    AC 1 needs 512MB RAM for WinXP & 256 MB DirectX 9.0c Graphics Card with Shader Model 3.0 or higher.
    Try another crack. See if its work.

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    ok bhaiya i'll try

  9. #9

    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Quote Originally Posted by Z!mM3r View Post
    ok bhaiya i'll try
    Try to suicide likeanik_lc said?

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    assassins creeds' story telling is one of the best among games!

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    New IGN Feature
    The History of Assassin's Creed
    Tracing the ancient history of gaming's most lethal franchise.

    When rising-star producer Jade Raymond officially unveiled Ubisoft's newest IP, she didn't have to say much. She merely demoed the game, and the breathtaking 12th century world of Assassin's Creed spoke for itself.

    She didn't mention that it took four years to develop, originally started as an entirely different game, or how it represented a major leap of faith for Ubisoft in every conceivable way. And no one guessed just how well that gamble would pay off.


    Nothing is True


    After years toiling away on B-list licensed titles, Ubisoft's Montreal studio pushed into the A-list with an exciting, revolutionary game called Splinter Cell. Unfortunately, producer Yannis Mallat wasn't on that team. His group had just delivered Donald Duck: Going Quackers. Now they wanted to step up to the big time, too...particularly Quackers' lead designer, Patrice Desilets.

    Their conversation drifted to Prince of Persia, a franchise Ubisoft didn't actually own. But after the disastrous Prince of Persia 3D, it turned out the rights were available, and Desilets' ideas for where to take the series inspired Mallat to draw resources for a quick AVI demo. One hurdle remained: The Prince's creator, Jordan Mechner, still held partial ownership, and he'd soured on the gaming industry after Prince 3D crashed and burned. Mallat flew Mechner up to Montreal, and Desilets' short, crude animation of the Prince running along walls, leaping off, and grabbing hold of ladders sold him.

    Ubisoft bought the franchise. Mechner wrote the story. Desilets cut loose as the lead designer. Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time became a hit, and the swashbuckling combination of platforming, puzzles, and acrobatic combat elevated it to legendary status.

    While Mallat moved ahead with sequels (and eventually moved into the CEO's office), Ubisoft's directors wanted their new star designer focused on a Prince for the incoming 7th generation consoles. While his core Sands of Time crew played with Anvil, a proprietary engine that let them build huge environments and fill them with huge populations, Desilets dove into the history of the Middle East looking for inspiration. He soon found the Hashshashin, a 12th century order of assassins that held to a strict code of conduct -- harm no innocents, execute all targets publicly, in spectacular fashion, to instill fear.

    Desilets envisioned players walking through real ancient cities full of life on their way to kill a man. They could go anywhere, blend into the crowds for a stealthy approach, parkour through streets and across rooftops, perform amazing acrobatic assassinations, or climb the highest spires to see everything. And everything they saw could be reached with a little legwork...after diving off and landing in a conveniently placed hay bale.

    Only that didn't really sound like Prince of Persia.

    The team pivoted, and Ubisoft trusted Desilets enough to go with it. This would be Ubisoft's first attempt at an open-world game, set in a time period generally ignored by the industry, offering gameplay that veered away from safe, recognizable options in a completely new franchise. To help steer it, Ubisoft assigned a relatively new hire as Desilets' producer. Jade Raymond only had four games on her resume -- two as a programmer, two as a producer -- but she brought something few others at Ubisoft had: experience with open-world gaming. Assassin's Creed got the green light.

    Over the next three years, they recreated the ancient cities of Jerusalem, Damascus, Acre, and the hub fortress at Masyaf, historical home of the Hashshashin, plus much of the surrounding countryside. Over 10,000 character animations went in, compared to the Sands of Time's 500. The lead assassin picked up a name, Altair (literally, "the flyer"), an eagle motif borrowed from Vladimir Bartol's 1938 novel Alamut, and a quest to fulfill. Nine men, based on real historical figures, had to die to end the madness of the crusades and restore Altair's tainted honor.

    Only that turned out to be a pretext for the real plot. Halfway through production, Raymond -- now the public face of the franchise -- started releasing hints to the press that Creed wasn't limited to the 12th century.

    Well after its E3 debut, Ubisoft revealed that the game actually took place in the 21st century and starred an unwitting bartender named Desmond Miles...a prisoner forced to relive the genetic memories of his ancestor, Altair, via a machine called the Animus. His captors at Abstergo Industries -- a front for the assassins' longtime enemies, the Knights Templar -- were desperate to find mysterious artifacts called the Pieces of Eden and possibly avert doomsday. Altair's exploits carried vital clues to the hunt.

    A gorgeous game. An award-winning designer. A cool sci-fi edge. Jesper Kyd's amazing soundtrack. Years of hype and build-up. Ubisoft confidently slotted their golden child, the first in a planned franchise, against holiday-season heavy hitters like Halo 3, Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare, and the first Mass Effect.

    Then it landed with a critical thud.


    Renaissance



    For everything Assassin's Creed did right, it did something wrong. Each assassination required performing several monotonous "research" side quests. Riding a horse at full gallop somehow alerted guards to your murderous intent. Open combat wasn't the greatest. Desmond's out-of-the-animus sequences all felt like chores. Nobody denied the technical achievements, but many felt let down by the actual experience. Suddenly, Ubisoft's franchise plans looked doubtful.

    But despite mixed reactions, Creed became the fastest-selling game in U.S. history, eventually moving over 9 million units...far surpassing Ubisoft's pre-release projections.

    Now sequels and side-games kicked into high gear. A Nintendo DS game, Alair's Chronicles, arrived first and, suffering from the first game's problems and lacking its successes, largely went ignored. Desilets and Raymond, however, were on the hook to deliver a true sequel for holiday 2009, in half the time it took to make the first game. Neither had made a sequel before.

    Barely a month after Altair's Chronicles launched, Ubisoft released footage showing their assassin sneaking around a modern battlefield and firing assault weapons at robotic enemies. That turned out to be an April Fools gag featuring Solid Snake in assassin's clothing, but the real shock hit when word came down that Altair wouldn't star in Assassin's Creed II.

    With Desmond and the Animus as a frame, Desilets could take the series anywhere and to any period in history with ease. After Creed's bad press, the sequel needed a fresh start with a fresh assassin. Speculation began on where -- and when -- Desilets would take the story, with even Wedbush Morgan analyst Michael Pachter theorizing the French Revolution as the new setting. In fact, the Montreal team had long settled on the Italian Renaissance. As both a metaphor and a locale, it fit perfectly; an exciting, colorful new environment that didn't divert too much from the first game's back alleys and busy plazas.

    For a new assassin, they cast Ezio Auditore da Firenze, a dashing young Florentine out to avenge the betrayal and murder of his father and brothers at the hands of the infamous Borgia clan, themselves secretly Templar agents. Eventually, he would come to join the Assassin Order alongside historical allies Leonardo da Vinci and Niccolo Machiavelli.



    Desmond also got a major upgrade. The game opened with assassin agents busting him out of Abstergo and enlisting him in their fight to stop the Templars from spreading their influence on a global scale. Even better, due to a bleeding affect from his time spent in the Animus, Desmond picked up all his ancestors' acrobatic moves and his very own version of the hidden blade...Creed's signature spring-loaded weapon.

    Targets didn't need to be researched anymore, and indeed, killing high-profile victims only became one part of the picture. Then, midway through development, Desilets realized they were falling into the same trap of creating huge environments with very little to actually do. The team added secret locations to explore and a monetary system that played out on multiple levels. Repaired shops offered discounted armor and weapons. Workers or working girls for hire would distract guards. Ezio could also just throw a handful of florins on the ground to create mass confusion.

    Getting that money was even more fun. Optional side quests abounded, or Ezio could simply pickpocket scores of pedestrians as they passed. A notoriety system built as he made trouble and dropped as he disposed of his wanted posters. Combat overhauls also took priority. Where Altair often had to run from confrontation, Ezio could always stand his ground with a fluid display of swordsmanship.

    Desilets and his team scrubbed away every flaw and punctuated every success from Assassin's Creed and they did it under a crushing deadline. Series writer Corey May solidified the Assassin-Templar war as the narrative focal point and turned the mind-controlling powers of the Pieces of Eden into a credible threat with extraterrestrial origins. This time, everything clicked.



    When Assassin's Creed II released that November, nobody expected much out of it. By year's end, Ubisoft racked up dozens of Game of the Year awards and nominations, near-universal acclaim, and stellar sales.

    Compared to that fanfare, few even noticed the two portable games that arrived side-by-side with their console big brother. Assassin's Creed: Bloodlines featured Altair's last hurrah as the series star, while Assassin's Creed: Discovery pitted Ezio against Grand Inquisitor Tomas Torquemada. What fans really wanted was a resolution to AC II's many dangling plot threads, and Ubisoft wanted to capitalize on that desire immediately.

    The first game took four years to develop. The second, only two. Now Ubisoft committed to releasing a full console-class Assassin's Creed every year. But they'd have to do it without Jade Raymond...and without Patrice Desilets.

    Everything is Permitted



    In May 2010, the same month Ubisoft revealed the existence of Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood, Raymond confirmed her promotion to studio head of Ubisoft Toronto. Less than a month later, Desilets resigned from Ubisoft in what the company described as "a creative break from the industry."

    Ubisoft refused to elaborate on Desilets' overnight departure, but insisted he'd already completed his role on Brotherhood, due to release just five months later...once again alongside a Halo, a Call of Duty, and a Mass Effect. When Ubisoft debuted it at the following E3, Desilets' name didn't come up. It all added to fears that Brotherhood would be a cheap, rushed sequel missing Desilets' magic.

    But Brotherhood turned out to be anything but. Ezio's story in AC II ended abruptly after discovering a hologram that spoke not to him, but directly to Desmond. Brotherhood took up the narrative slack to finish the fight against the Borgia-led Templars and trace Ezio's evolution into the leader of the Assassin Order.

    Both narrative lines folded neatly into new gameplay features. Ezio could now recruit and manage a crew of assassins, sending them out on missions to earn money or saving them to use in a tough situation. Instead of upgrading his villa in Monteriggioni, he paid to repair dilapidated Rome -- the primary setting -- and liberated it one district at a time by infiltrating Borgia towers and burning them to the ground. Thankfully, the repairs included a fast-travel system around the city.



    But gamers unknowingly got a preview of the biggest addition to the franchise via an iPhone game released just four months after AC II. Developed by the same team that created Splinter Cell's popular Spies vs. Mercenaries mode, Brotherhood's multiplayer cast players as Abstergo agents training in the Animus, hunting an assigned target while being hunted themselves. In a brilliantly original twist, the more a player acted like an A.I. bot, the better their chances for survival.

    To everyone's surprise, Brotherhood turned out to be a more-than-worthy sequel and another financial winner. Less surprisingly, it ended on a cliffhanger. As Desmond closed in on a Piece of Eden known as the Apple, another hologram appeared and forced him to stab Lucy Stillman, his rescuer and budding love interest.

    Almost one year later to the day, Ubisoft will resolve that small complication in Assassin's Creed: Revelations, the series swan song for the Renaissance era. Ezio, already showing signs of age in Brotherhood, is now in his 50s when a quest takes him all the way back to the assassin stronghold at Masyaf, forward to Istanbul at the height of the Ottoman Empire, and down into an underground Templar city.

    Altair reportedly returns as a playable character, but nearly everyone else on the project is new. Lorne Balfe steps in as musical director, replacing outgoing Jesper Kyd. Corey May cedes writing duties to Darby McDevitt, who scripted the canceled Nintendo DS game Assassin's Creed: Lost Legacy (from which Revelations borrows many plot points). But the task of stepping into Patrice Desilets' shoes falls to Far Cry 2's art director, Alexandre Amancio, now taking his first stab at both a creative director role and the Assassin's Creed franchise. One of Amancio's early, controversial additions: a tower-defense minigame where Ezio directs his assassins to stop Templars from retaking liberated areas.

    Judging from an E3 demo where Ezio destroyed an entire fleet of ships to escape a harbor blockade, age hasn't dulled his abilities. Nevertheless, Revelations ends both Ezio's and Altair's cycle in the story. Desmond's finale will resolve at the end of 2012, timed to match the series' (and Mayan culture's) apocalyptic predictions, in what many expect to be Assassin's Creed III.



    Whether that game features Desmond as a full-fledged, present-day assassin remains to be seen, but Amancio's already looking to a future without him. The next cycle will start clean, with new characters in a new setting. History, after all, is their playground.

    Meanwhile, Patrice Desilets' "creative break" officially ended in summer 2011, when he signed aboard THQ's Montreal studio, while Jade Raymond oversees as many as six titles from her Ubisoft Toronto studio, including the next Splinter Cell. The franchise they built together continues without them, but it's worth noting that, as a series, Assassin's Creed consistently took risks and defied expectations from early conception onward. It will endure so long as it adheres a simple motto.

    "Nothing is true. Everything is permitted."


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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Producer Jade Raymond tells us why Assassin's Creed is not just a game, but a crusade to revolutionise a genre

    Assassin's Creed producer Jade Raymond recently shot into the spotlight at Microsoft's X06 event where she received a bigger round of applause than Peter Moore - and that's before she even had a chance to say anything! Having previously worked on The Sims Online for EA, she now heads up the core team responsible for the Prince of Persia series. Assassin's Creed is an extraordinarily good-looking game where you take on the role of a medieval hitman during the Crusades. It promises to be far more thoughtful and inventive than anything we've seen before in an action game.

    Is it true that the game was originally titled Prince of Persia Assassins, and was going to be part of the POP universe?



    Jade Raymond:
    I've had a few people ask me this and I'm not sure where the rumour came from. Assassins is being developed by the Prince of Persia team in Montreal but was never intended to be part of that series. Instead of using Arabian legends we decided to take inspiration from a book called Alamut, by the Slovenian writer Vladimir Bartol.


    Is the game's focus stealth like Splinter Cell or action like Prince of Persia?



    Jade Raymond:
    Our goal with this game is to deliver completely next-gen gameplay, so the team set the bar where no game has gone before. I really wouldn't call it a stealth game because it's much more focused on fast-paced action. The only stealth element is the social stealth where you use the crowds to disguise yourself, but we've steered clear of the traditional rules of stealth games like hiding in shadows or sneaking around corners. That's not really what Assassin's Creed is striving for at all.


    Why did you set the game during the Crusades?



    Jade Raymond:
    In the book Alamut, the Assassins are a historical clan that came to be during the Crusades. And in terms of gameplay and game structure, we could see the Crusades would work really well. You have all kinds of narrow streets that are great for bustling crowds, and lots of complicated architectural details that makes for interesting level design. And also you have this time that's filled with a lot of warfare and drama.


    Were you ever worried that gamers, particularly in the US, might not understand the history of the Crusades and be put off?



    Jade Raymond:
    We really believe as a company that in order to reach the next level in entertainment, you need to look for richer subject matter and for there to be more meaning and depth to games. The whole historical part helps that because it's loosely based on real events and situations that are relevant to people. But we're still aware that we're making a game and our ultimate goal is to provide fun and fast-paced action. So for people whose knowledge of history is sketchy, the Crusades will just be a setting to them. What they're really going to notice is a new gameplay experience.


    We've seen futuristic elements in the game - is there going to be a big revelation as to where your character comes from?



    Jade Raymond:
    Well, there will be a massive revelation but I can't say what at the moment. I wouldn't call it sci-fi, although there are elements that are relevant to the modern day.


    Does the game include RPG elements where you can improve the Assassin's abilities?



    Jade Raymond:
    Yes. One of our designers is a massive RPG fan and one of our goals was to achieve the satisfaction of levelling-up. A lot of really cool rewards spring from our RPG elements. You start out the game as a Master Assassin with all of your abilities, and at the end of the first mission your rank is stripped away. And then you spend the rest of the game completing missions and trying to regain your previous standing with the Assassin clan. The RPG elements are very much tied into the story.

    We've seen some enemies jump over rooftops, but are the enemies also able to climb up walls in pursuit of you?



    Jade Raymond:
    Obviously the enemies you encounter will vary in skill level. One thing about building an engine from the ground up is that you can do things in a smarter way than before. So previously you'd create a main character and only get around to thinking about enemies later in the process. We took a different approach and used an inheritance system so if we want, the enemies can do everything the main character can. We've spent a lot of time on enemy AI that can find its own paths, and they also have all the abilities by default. They're going to ramp up in difficulty as you go through the game. The only limitation to their agility is what we want in terms of level design.


    Prince of Persia had the rewind time option to help you rectify mistakes. What happens if you make a serious mistake in Assassin's Creed? Will you have to restart the mission?



    Jade Raymond:
    It depends how much trouble you're in. There are different levels of trouble so if you cause a commotion in the crowd, there are certain ways to calm them down. If you have the guards after you, there's a line of sight system so if you stay out of view they won't be able to find you. You can also look for hiding spots in the crowd where you can blend in and not be seen - do that, and the enemies will eventually forget about you. But if you really cause problems and get into a big fight, an entirely new system kicks in... But I can't talk about this at the moment.


    It's fairly unusual to play a character whose occupation is murder. Hitman tempered that with a black sense of humour. How have you made the fact that you're playing a killer enjoyable for those gamers used to playing the good guy?



    Jade Raymond:
    I can see why your thinking of the Hitman analogy, but our central character is actually quite different. Our goal is to create a positive character who's really more of a hero. He's not killing people because it's his job, and he's not a bitter guy either. He's actually a guy who has very specific thoughts and feelings about killing, and this makes him always respectful of his victims. Additionally, the way we've set it up is that the people you kill are all evil characters. There's almost a Robin Hood-style comparison to be made. Well, he's more of a badass than Robin Hood, but you see where we're coming from. All of the guys you take out are causing the general population a lot of hardship and strife.


    Are the horse-riding sections going to be a challenge, or are they just sequences that blend the cities together?



    Jade Raymond:
    It's not like you're riding the horse on a path or anything. The horse has a bit of a personality and does certain things to help you in fight situations. He reacts to stress and reacts to enemies being around you. You can also fight on horseback; you need to learn certain commands to do things like make him jump or do acrobatics from the saddle to reach higher places. So there's quite a bit of depth to the horse. We've had an animator and a programmer working for almost two years on just the horse.

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    Default Re: A History of Assassin's Creed

    Interview with Oliver Bowden about the book Assassins Creed: The Secret Crusade

    So this is the first Assassin’s Creed novel that’s not a direct adaptation of the game. What’s the reason for that?

    Actually, there are major parts of it adapted from the two games starring AltaÔr, but, yes, about a third of it is new material, and the reason for that was a desire to build a backstory for him, one that told of his journey from childhood through to master assassin and beyond, and joined the dots with the Ezio storyline.

    Would you recommend reading the book before playing Assassin’s Creed Revelations? Will it spoil some parts? Will it allow a better understanding of the game’ story?


    Three schools of thought: you might want to read the book first to whet your appetite, to give you a feeling that you’re getting the edge on the game, or you might want to read it afterwards, or while you’re playing, to give you a richer understanding of the story.

    Why Niccolo Polo?

    NiccolÚ and Maffeo* are the link between AltaÔr and Ezio, so they make a great bridge between the two sets of narratives.

    How do you come up with the ideas for the plot of the book(s)?

    As ever, in a variety of ways. The world of Assassin’s Creed owes a lot to historical veracity, so there will often be a real-life character or event that gets the juices flowing. Or often when you’re writing a scene it needs to fulfill an emotional function in the book, so you look for ways to best and most dramatically illustrate that. Also, of course, from books and films that have fired my imagination.

    How do you deal with deadlines?


    With coffee. But actually there’s nothing like a deadline to focus the mind.

    Just how much freedom did you get when working on Assassin’s Creed The Last Crusade?


    For Assassin’s Creed The Secret Crusade, I initially sat down with the game writers to come up with a framework for the story, then went away to work on the finer points of the plotting, and I was very lucky in that the writers weren’t hugely prescriptive when it came to plotting out how the storyline would unfold. They knew what needed to happen, but how it happened they left up to me, which was probably the most satisfying aspect of the whole project. Having seen the Assassin’s Creed operation up close I could see how much work and detail goes into it, so I was incredibly honoured firstly to be given so much trust in that regard and secondly that my ideas made the cut, and that there’s a bit of ‘me’ in the world and history of AltaÔr.

    Do you play the games a lot before and/or during the writing process?

    Yes and yes. Any excuse…

    Who are your favorite authors? Your sources of inspiration?


    Prior to starting work on Assassins Creed, I read some Walter Scott, who I really came to enjoy, especially The Talisman. Other favourite authors include Stephen King, Graham Masterton, Jonathan Lethem, Michel Faber and Michael Chabon. I’m a horror fan, and I like to collect tatty old horror books from the 1980s, the more lurid the cover the better. Filmwise, it’s horror films, Spaghetti westerns. Nothing especially edifying, I’m afraid…

    Philosophy:
    *Niccolo and Maffeo Polo, 13th century traders, are respectively the father and uncle of Marco Polo, a venetian explorer. The three of them explored Asia for many years, and the memories Marco Polo wrote are said to have inspired Christopher Columbus (Ed.)


    Ubiworkshop source
    Last edited by Trave160; November 23rd, 2011 at 21:24.

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