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    Default Lara Croft: The Evolution

    This is how Lara Croft change over times & with games.



    Love her or hate her, in the late ‘90s you couldn’t ignore Lara Croft. The buxom beauty vaulted to cyber-stardom among a sea of male protagonists. It’s hard to deny that the phenomenon of Lara’s success was inextricably tied to her physical presentation – her nature as a projection of both power and sexual fantasies. There was no overlooking the cinched waistline and impossible curves, the inflated lips and elongated legs, or the excessive flexibility and effortless grace. Some embraced Lara as an inspiration for these very reasons. Others shunned her as a chauvinistic objectification.
    Through eight console iterations, Lara Croft’s visage has continued to evolve – constantly straddling the line between fantasy and reality, idealism and believability. With Crystal Dynamic's Tomb Raider reboot, the studio is looking to cut Lara Croft from an entirely new cloth. We look back at official art over the past fifteen years and detail the metamorphosis of Lady Lara.







    Tomb Raider
    Year: 1996
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation, Sega Saturn, PC, Mac






    Lara Croft’s iconic look was set in stone with the release of Tomb Raider in 1996. Her distinctive face was dominated by wide brown eyes, thick, angular brows, and swollen lips. Lara’s hair has become a pillar of her identity throughout the years – stray auburn strands framing her face – but the look wasn’t fully realized in the first console release. Although her trademark braid was present in official art and renders, it was implied in the game itself. The in-game model had hair chopped at the nape of her neck, as the braid proved too difficult to realize in play.
    Lara’s exaggerated stats – widely accepted as 34D/24/35 (at 5 ft. 9 in.) – created a memorable silhouette. Perched atop a pair of towering legs, Lara’s demure waist supported an unnaturally oversized bust. Croft’s ensemble aptly drew attention to her curvaceous physique. A cotton/lycra leotard clung to Lara like a second skin, straining against her augmented assets. Complemented with brown canvas shorts that left little to the imagination, Lara’s complete ensemble provided Core (and players) incentive to get creative with camera angles.
    Bulky black holsters were accented with an unusually large brass buckle, which according to The Art of Tomb Raider, was enlarged to mask an awkward polygon juncture. A pair of rugged combat boots, brown knapsack, and fingerless gloves topped off the look. With the addition of Lara’s ever-present twin pistols, an icon was born.






    Tomb Raider II
    Year: 1997
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation, PC, Mac






    Not wanting to drastically alter s formula that had proven so successful, Lara Croft remained much the same in her 1997 follow-up. Slight adjustments to Lara’s face were made – her eyes more vivid and framed by thicker lashes – although they were often hidden behind her unique red shades.
    Lara also seemed to develop a wider emotional spectrum. The official art documented a predisposition for bearing her teeth in a sneer or slightly unnerving grin. Croft was also gifted long locks in Tomb Raider 2 via an in-game braid.
    In Tomb Raider, Lara’s original ensemble suited her just fine for excursions in every climate. Returning for seconds, however, Lara’s wardrobe diversified to reflect different locales. In addition to her blue leotard, Lara donned a fitted bomber jacket, clingy Sola wetsuit, and skimpy blue robe. Chances are that most Tomb Raider fans remember that particular encounter – the shower and shotgun make it hard to forget.





    Tomb Raider III
    Year: 1998
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation, PC, Mac






    Lara’s third adventure found her uncovering secrets in India, Nevada, the South Pacific, and more. Continuing the trend of annual releases, Croft again had little time to evolve from a physical standpoint other than slight improvements to in-game graphics and renders – added polygons continuing to round out her once humorously pointy “curves.” Instead of a visual overhaul, Core opted to continue diversifying her ensembles and equipment.
    Lara barred her midriff for the first time in the South Pacific, sporting a white athletic bra and green shorts. Her core remained exposed as she infiltrated Area 51, donning blue camouflage pants and a grey crop top. In this particular look, Lara sported a naval piercing. Other outfits included a skin-tight catsuit and environment appropriate Arctic gear, each ensemble boasting slightly different boots and holsters.
    With Lara’s popularity snowballing, Core took more risks promoting Lara in the third game – openly embracing her sex appeal. Provocative photos of Lara smoking a cigar ran aside gratuitous cleavage shots, a slew of sexy implied nudes, and slinky evening attire.



    Tomb Raider: The Last Revelation
    Year: 1999
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation, Dreamcast, PC, Mac



    Another year, another Tomb Raider title. In Tomb Raider: The Last Revelation, Lara Croft gave up her globetrotting ways for a single adventure in the arid deserts of Egypt. This eliminated the need for more than one ensemble, and as such Lara spent the game in her classic (and increasingly mundane) outfit. A flashback to a teenage Lara Croft provided a splash of diversity, showcasing the pint-sized adventurer in pigtails, green shorts, a white crop top, and matching camouflage vest. Despite being a teen, Lara wasn’t missing her trademark curves.





    Early adopters and fans of Tomb Raider usually note The Last Revelation as where their interest in the franchise began to wane, perhaps because yearly releases resulted in a plateau of both visuals and mechanics.





    Tomb Raider: Chronicles
    Year: 2000
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation, Dreamcast, PC, Mac





    Presumed Dead, Lara Croft looked unusually well for a ghost in Tomb Raider: Chronicles. Told through the eyes of reminiscing friends, four unique adventures required as many outfits for Lara. Traversing through Rome had her in the traditional raiding garb, although a brief cameo of an elegant opera dress kicked off the encounter. A trip to Russia clothed Lara in a black and white jumpsuit – a dark knit cap atop her head.
    Teenage Lara returned for a brief adventure, and Core got a bit risqué in a voyeuristic scene of Lara nearly changing. Lara’s final destination had her negotiating through a high-tech tower in her black catsuit, this time upgraded with communications equipment and slick shades.
    Five years with five consecutive releases again resulted in little change to Lara’s physical presentation, although hints of a darker and more aggressive disposition were evident in key art. Perhaps it was a precursor to what was on the horizon.







    Tomb Raider: The Angel of Darkness
    Year: 2003
    Developer: Core Design
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: PlayStation 2, PC, Mac





    Angel of Darkness was a massively ambitious endeavor. Marking Tomb Raider’s graduation from PlayStation-era consoles, Core used the opportunity to implement a complete visual overhaul.
    Departing from annual releases, Core took three years to develop and publish Angel of Darkness, using that time to redefine Lara through a more somber lens. Technical advancements allowed for an increasingly realistic looking Croft, as did Core’s decision to step away from outlandishly exaggerated features. Lara’s new look included a slightly narrower face, although it continued to house wide eyes and large lips. Playing off the shifting theme, Lara’s eyes were darker – rimmed in charcoal and significantly less luminous than in past iterations. Her braided whip of hair was also lower and looser, as if hastily constructed. As for Lara’s physique, more realistic proportions were rendered in over 5000 polygons, as opposed to the 350 utilized in the original Tomb Raider.
    Taking place in modern locations such as Paris and Prague, Angel of Darkness saw Lara as a fugitive framed for murder and her understated ensembles reflected that fact. Lara’s traditional outfit became a relic of the past, with her instead stepping into a dark crop top and deep green camo shorts for the bulk of her journey. Lara also donned a similar variant with pants, a wetsuit, and a civilian outfit of faded denim jeans, a matching jacket, and dark shades. Updated and significantly more utilitarian equipment lent a lot to the believability of Lara’s presentation, with her guns, holsters, boots, and backpack all redesigned.
    Lara’s new presentation wasn’t ill received so much as the unresponsive controls and buggy play. Despite the obvious ambition, Angel of Darkness was marred from a technical standpoint. Often referred to as unfinished, Angel of Darkness marked the end of Core’s reign over Lara Croft.



    Tomb Raider: Legend
    Year: 2006
    Developer: Crystal Dynamics
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: Xbox 360, Xbox, PlayStation 2, PSP, GameCube, PC



    Despite the enterprising attitude, Angel of Darkness didn’t usher in a new and modern era for the Tomb Raider franchise. As such, U.S. developer Crystal Dynamics inherited the property, crafting a new title for a slew of platforms including the Xbox 360. Crystal waited three years before debuting a new Lara to the world, releasing Legend in 2006. Lara’s direction under Crystal continued the trend of rooting her in reality – items were designed with purpose rather than for simple aesthetics. Her clothing, gear, and weapons appeared tailored to her outlandish lifestyle, and in that sense, were practical. Lara lost her archaic braid in favor of a simpler ponytail, and her reconstructed face boasted hints of makeup, more naturally shaped eyebrows, and softer lips – although Crystal opted to retain the classic M shape of her mouth.
    Lara’s body was also refined. While still maintaining idealistic proportions, her silhouette was more in line with that of an athlete than a pin-up model. Lara’s default outfit highlighted improved muscle tone with large expanses of bare skin, still paying tribute to her hip-hugging legacy. The shorts and crop top were joined by other ensembles, such as a stylish motorbike jacket, practical winter attire, and an infamous cocktail dress.
    Crystal maintained other important elements of Lara’s identity, including her holsters, twin pistols, backpack, and combat boots – all modified, however, to fit the new scope of the game. Lara boasted new equipment, too, such as a row of grenades along the small of her back, a flashlight, binoculars, and a rappel device. Lara was becoming increasingly utilitarian, without sacrificing her sex appeal.
    Lara’s upgraded appearance didn’t go to waste. Crystal whipped up a slew of unlockable outfits for Lara to romp around in, including the ever-popular black bikini.






    Tomb Raider: Underworld
    Year: 2008
    Developer: Crystal Dynamics
    Publisher: Eidos Interactive
    Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 2, PC, Nintendo Wii





    Developed for current generation hardware, Tomb Raider: Underworld offered Crystal Dynamics a chance to continue pushing Lara’s physical presentation. Having found solid footing with Legend (and Anniversary), nuance became key in Lara’s most recent adventure. Again embracing a more proportional build, Lara’s muscles became even more defined – especially in her arms, abdomen, and thighs. Lara’s face took a stronger appearance, too, more striking with defined cheekbones, thick black eyeliner, and glossed lips.
    Lara’s outfit again gravitated toward athletic gear – comprised of a lycra-like fabric and breathable mesh housed in a design one wouldn’t be surprised to find at retail. Other Underworld ensembles such as Lara’s cheeky wetsuit may have been less practical, but generally speaking her outfits continued to trend toward believability. Until you checked out the unlockable roster, that is.
    Underworld offered Crystal a chance to make Lara’s interactions with the environment even more involved. Lara would remain wet for a time after swimming, and become caked in mud as she explored. At 32,000 polygons, Lara looked pretty sharp, even when messy.



    In the fifteen years since her debut, Lara Croft has transformed from a cartoon-like amalgamation of tropes and fantasies to that of a more grounded and athletic adventurer – even if she has remained fantasy fodder.

    Source: Gameinformer


    Details about new Lara Croft will be revealed in two days. Will add the info when they revealed it.

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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution

    Anik Bhai Lot of Thanks To U. Lara Croft Somporke Amar Jana Chilo Na Temon. Akhon Jana Hoiya Galo. +1 Bro.
    A strong man doesn't need to read the future, he makes his own


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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution





















    Enjoy! I know I did!
    Last edited by abir; December 9th, 2010 at 01:45.

    "Game after game after game, I realized what is most important of my life - FOOTBALL.."
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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution

    A Survivor Is Born: The New Lara Croft



    Redesigning an icon is an immensely difficult task. IP holders must tread lightly – the considerations of fans and critics alike maintain that every decision will be a precarious one. With Lara Croft’s iconic look so engrained in popular culture, Crystal Dynamics had to meticulously research and iterate upon her physical presentation before a final direction was chosen for the franchise reboot. Its biggest challenge was finding a middle ground between familiarity and freshness, vulnerability and strength, and the all-important trifecta of brains, brawn, and beauty.

    On Tuesday we took a look back at how Lara Croft has evolved throughout the ages. Now, Global Brand Director Karl Stewart and Art Director Brian Horton address Crystal Dynamics' rational for the redesign, the iconography of Lara Croft, and how they hope the new look will help once again make her a culturally relevant hero.



    The Origin’s Origin
    Karl Stewart: This was originally supposed to be a continuation of Underworld. Instead, it became a case of us realizing that it was not the way we needed to go. We had to stop in our tracks and reevaluate everything in order to choose a new direction. The origin story came about through lots of research and deciding how to reposition Lara to get her where she needed to go. A reboot wasn’t at the top of the list to begin with, but it certainly shone through as the direction the franchise needed.



    An Issue of Relevance
    Brian Horton: We wanted to make a version of Lara that you would recognize as Lara Croft, but that felt relevant to today’s gaming audience. I think people are looking for realism in their games and they want to believe in their characters. We want people to care for Lara at the end of the day. And if they can look at her and go “this is someone that I want to help through this survival journey,” then we have met our goal.

    Motivation
    Horton: For me, every character design starts with who that person is and what motivates them. What we chose to do very early on was not to start with the surface qualities and to focus more so on who Lara is as a character. We felt that if we could understand that, then the surface qualities and how the character looked would be derived from that biography. So we knew we wanted to make an origin story. We knew we wanted to make a young Lara Croft, and we wanted her be a blend of someone that has a level of vulnerability and inner strength. She has this aspirational quality. She wants to be someone and to pull away from the perception of who she is because of her legacy of being a Croft. She is her own person and she is trying to make her way in this world. So that was the focus early on – trying to understand who she was inside.

    Once we understood that biography, the next step was to make her as believable and relatable as possible. We wanted to make a girl that was somewhat familiar, yet had a special quality about her – something in the way her eyes look and her expression in her face that makes you want to care for her. That was our number one goal when we started thinking about her visualization – that people would have empathy for Lara, while at the same time knowing she has this inner strength that will allow her to become a hero. That was the first order of business.



    Fresh…
    Horton: What dropped away pretty quickly was the hardness that she had. She is strong and we love Lara Croft for that strength, but she was almost so strong that we were always one step away from her. That was one thing that we all agreed on right away – to try and soften her up enough so that you could step into her life. All of the character design decisions came from trying to make her believable. We didn’t want to make her a sexual object. She is a character that we want you to believe in.



    …but Familiar
    Horton: A lot of it comes down to study. We spent a lot of time researching actors and people that you look at and say “we like these people,” and you can’t help but want to get to know them. We wanted that mix of someone who is aspirational, but familiar at the same time. We want people to be asking themselves where they know that girl from. Then people will care about her. How we did that is a mix of iteration. We spent a lot of time iterating on Lara.

    Iconography of Lara Croft
    Horton: We started doing a battery of concepts, beginning with silhouettes. Then we started to build up features and dissect who she was as a character and the things that made her iconic. The things that we absolutely kept were the brown eyes, the signature quality of her lips having that M shape, and the relationship between the eyes and the nose and the mouth. Those were things we knew we wanted to maintain. But we also knew we wanted to bring her into a more believable proportionality and surface quality. That was another big push for us. We wanted to bring her into this world and ground her as much as possible.
    We realized that Lara’s hair was a big part of her visual language – the iconography of Lara croft includes her ponytail. But we also knew we didn’t want to do something like the classic braid. We wanted to have the hair itself tell a bit of the story. So the hair moves and helps to sell the drama. We felt that it was an important aspect to keep because when you are always seeing a character from behind, the hair moving and whipping around in the wind is a very important component. Her hair comes down to about the middle of her back. The idea is to have it at the right length to give it some great secondary motion in action sequences.



    Eyes Up Here
    Stewart: We did some initial tests where we brought in the vision for the new Lara Croft, and then we matched it up against the previous iterations. In the tests of the previous iterations it was clearly evident that people moved around the image more to the items and her chest and her waist size. But with the new image, people spent most of the time piercing her eyes. Anybody who has seen the image says “I know that girl.”

    A Head Short
    Horton: What it came down to is that we wanted to have certain proportionality when we put her next to the men. We wanted a clear size difference. She isn’t going to be as tall as the men around her – about a head shorter. This reinforces the feeling that she’s against all odds. The relative proportion is more important than the actual number [5’ 7”] – making her feel like a scrapper of sorts, even though she will always find a way through her self-determination. She will find a way to survive even if she doesn’t have Amazonian proportions in the game. The emphasis on acrobatics isn’t nearly as important as the fact that she is capable.



    Capturing Beauty
    Horton: We went through an exhaustive process once we finished the concepts. We came up with the characteristics of a girl that we wanted, and then we did a casting session and cast a couple of models that had different characteristics we liked. The bone structure was important, but we also didn’t want to get a model that was too sculpted. We wanted a little bit of that baby fat – just a little bit of roundness on the face to give her that more youthful look. We full-body scanned both of them to capture those traits before we started our own model.

    Function over Form
    Horton: The Big thing for me – and for us – as we were designing Lara was trying to find something that felt both iconic and timeless at the same time. So there was an exhaustive amount of research done in terms of the wardrobe and gear that was decided on, and how we chose to put them on for compositional reasons as well as functional reasons.


    We had goals of a realistic proportionality and a realistic wardrobe, and we wanted them to feel more like clothing – not an outfit. There is no such thing as an outfit for us. She is on this expedition and has practical clothing – cargo pants and layered tank tops and boots – because she is in and among a group that share the same values. Lara is beautiful, but she isn’t fashion forward. She does have two little earrings on one side because we wanted to update her in some respects. But she is more about her own internal world. The end result was a look that is both contemporary and timeless. We didn’t want the look to be too trendy or too hip, but she still needed to feel youthful and relevant, with an earthy and vulnerable quality to her on top of having that inner strength.



    Tribute
    Horton: Lara’s tank top starts off light grey. In certain light it looks blue, but it’s grey. One of the things we wanted to do was to let it feel blue at times. We wanted to get the feeling that it is fairly neutral, but when you look at it there is that sort of nod to the past, even though it is very contemporary when compared to the past. We wanted to evoke a feeling that the essence of Lara Croft is there when you look at her. There is still a lot of respect and love for Lara Croft as a character, even though we are reinventing her.

    Evolving Wardrobe
    Horton: The most important thing to me is that we not have wardrobe changes, but rather wardrobe evolution. The cumulative damage and wear and tear on the clothing is where evolution comes through in the outfit. I’m very excited to see that manifest throughout the game. Lara is just surviving from beginning to end. Through her situation her outfit is going to show the accumulation of that survival story. That is going to mean discoloration and rips and tears. That will sort of progress throughout the entire adventure. There will be other gear and items that will accumulate and change her look a bit, too.
    A Step too Far
    Horton: At one point, since survival is such an important element, we thought about having her bones break and she would be crippled in some way. And while we realized that it would be fantastic from a fiction standpoint, it would hurt us in gameplay. We want her to get damaged, and that is a huge part of how we present the character, but we didn’t want to go so far as to say that she had splints on and things like that. It was just a step too far from the gameplay goals.
    Beyond the Superficial
    Horton: We spent a lot of time talking about surface qualities and millimeters and proportions. But really what you look at in the game is what Lara does in the world, and I think that is so much more important than those final surface qualities. Our lead animator has done an amazing job making her feel connected to the world, and I think that is the extra ingredient. No matter how you design a character, it is how she acts in the world that makes her believable.
    Stewart: You will see that in a lot of the character performances. A lot of thought has been put into what Lara would do in a situation because she is fresh to the situation. For example, when she hears the scavenger for the first time, her natural reaction is to step back and ask “what the hell is that?” But as you progress she becomes stronger and her animations change, as does her character performance. So there are these stages that you have to go through. It isn’t just about being this beautiful girl and running from place to place.
    Horton: It’s about how she plays out in this world, and her interplay with other characters. Those interactions are going to be very different from what we’ve seen in past Tomb Raider titles. She isn’t always in charge. She will have these ranges of being the low man on the totem pole in the beginning and then finding her own voice.
    Lest Not Forget…
    Horton: As far as sex appeal, we are always thinking about making a character that people want to play, and part of that is a level of attractiveness and being drawn to Lara. But we don’t want to play up sexuality for sexualities sake. We are constantly talking about context and motivation on this project. If for any reason we wanted to put her in a situation that would be alluring, it isn’t to be alluring. It would be because the situation called for it.
    Lara is a lover of archeology and she has these book smarts. Her brains are another huge part of her sex appeal. She is an attractive girl who doesn’t play up her looks, but she is super smart and she is very ambitious.
    Ultimately, what I think is going to be compelling about this – and what our version of sexy is – is the toughness through adverse conditions. Seeing her survive through these moments. Her skin is still bare on the arms and there are going to be rips and tears on her clothes, but it won’t be about being revealing. It’s a way of saying that through these tough situations, there is a beauty and vulnerability coming through. I think that is sexy in its own way. There is a different tone we are going for across the board, and Lara Croft as a sex object isn’t our goal. No unlockable bikinis().




    Source: Gameinformer

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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution

    WoW...Its gonna be one hell of a LC game i guess...
    No 7. No discussion, sharing or referencing game hacks.
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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution

    Quote Originally Posted by tanveer View Post
    WoW...Its gonna be one hell of a LC game i guess...
    I would like to say "Hell Yeah".

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    Default Re: Lara Croft: The Evolution

    Quote Originally Posted by anik_lc View Post
    I would like to say "Hell Yeah".
    Dats another way of saying it
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