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Thread: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

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    Default High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    About this tutorial: This tutorial is made especially for beginners. The terms have been simplified than they should be in some cases. So, experts, do not complain, they are intended to be "noob-friendly". If you are an advanced user, you can also read through. You might learn something new. Topics are so vast that they deserve to have a standalone tutorial for each of them. So, I recommend you search the internet for more information about the topics to get a clearer idea.

    Introduction


    What is HDRI: HDRI stands for High Dynamic Range Imagery. What is dynamic range? Within the context of photography, dynamic range is the range of light, from little to much, that can be measured and recorded, normally by a single exposure. In simple words, it's the ability to "catch" the light in the image. Suppose, you have a cup and a bucket. Your bucket will hold significantly more liquid than your cup. Now apply the concept to photography, normal images hold little data, HDR images hold significantly more. Your eyes are designed to detect very high and very low light, and your eyes will auto adapt to catch the most amount of detail. But cameras cannot do that. See this image below.
    As you can see, your camera holds only a "fraction" of the dynamic range. To catch the scene as it is, you will need more than that. That's when HDR images come in. I strongly recommend you read this wikipedia article when you get some free time as it will help you a lot to understand what actually is HDR.

    Basic Knowledge


    Exposure: It's hard to simplify the concept of "exposure", but let's just say it determines how much light your camera will capture. Cameras shoot at a default 0 EV. Go negative (-1/-2/-3/-4/-5 etc.) and the image will become darker as you are capturing less light. The opposite will happen when you go to positive values (+1/+2/+3/+4/+5 etc.).

    Histogram: A histogram graphs the brightness values of individual pixels absorbed by the camera sensor within a digital image. Basically, it displays where all of the brightness levels contained in the scene are found, from the darkest to the brightest. It is basically a graph showing the brightness distribution of an image with pure black on one end, pure white on the other and grey in the middle. You might've noticed this before, but don't know what it means or does. To simplify this concept, see the image below.
    If your histogram looks like the left one, your image have lost detail in shadows. If it looks like the right one, then it has lost detail in the highlights. But if it does not touch the left and right edges and stays in the middle (any shape), then the both the highlights and shadows of your image are preserved. Most of the cameras now have the option to show histograms in camera. So, you can take a look at that and adjust your exposure bias to catch the detail.

    Bit Depth: This topic is complicated by birth, so we will try to skip the technical factors. Just remember it... the higher the bit depth of an image, the more information about the scene it will hold and therefore, the better. 16-bit images are a lot better than 8-bit ones, and 32-bit HDR images are significantly better than both 16 and 8 bit images. So, try to shoot/work with the maximum bit depth as it will make further editing easier and more flexible.

    Tone Mapping: HDR images have very high contrast ratio and thus, cannot be rendered by normal televisions or monitors. You need special HDR monitor to see the file as it is, and they are insanely expensive. How bright is the sun? And how dark is a cave? Just imagine your monitor is rendering a daylight scene where it hurts to look at the bright sun or sky but the shadowed cave is dark and has slightly visible details. An ordinary monitor cannot do that, but an HDR monitor can. Also, printed images do not have the ability to show such high dynamic range. So, there is a technique that reduces the contrast of the HDR image to get the details out but still maintaining an acceptable dynamic range which the monitors or televisions are able to render. This process is called tone mapping. The tone mapped image is basically a low dynamic range image. So, it is a process of converting high dynamic range images to low dynamic range images.

    What you need


    # A camera (be it point and shoot or DSLR)
    # Adobe Photoshop
    # Photomatix
    # Basic knowledge (included above)
    # Photoshop basic skill (the higher the better)

    You may use either Photoshop or Photomatix or both (I recommend both). If you want to go with only one program, then go with Photoshop as it will make post processing much easier.

    The Process

    You need at least 2 differently exposed images of the same scene (that means at the same time and same point of view). Most of the photographers use 3 differently exposed images. They may be +1/0/-1 EV or +2/0/-2 EV or theoretically any (most photographers prefer +2/0/-2). But try to keep the spacing constant. For example, you may, but should not go with +1.26/0/+2.14 EV. For intense scenes that have both very light and very dark areas, you might need a greater EV spacing (like +3/+2/+1/0/-1/-2/-3) to catch the details precisely. DSLR cameras are perfect for these conditions. Point and shoot cameras do not have much flexibility and only allow to shoot 3 differently exposed images at once. These set of differently exposed images are called bracketed photos/exposures.

    How you shoot the bracketed exposures varies depending on your camera. So, it is up to you to find out. Take the help of the camera's user's guide.

    Now when you have the bracketed exposures ready, put them in a separate folder (for the sake of arrangement). Then follow one of the two ways below.

    Photoshop: I have used Adobe Photoshop CS5 x64 for this tutorial:
    Run Photoshop. Go to File > Automate > Merge to HDR Pro


    # In the box that appears, click on Browse.


    # Navigate to the folder, select all exposures and click on OK.


    # You might choose to automatically align the images, and click OK.


    # Photoshop will align the images and open the HDR preview in the following window. Check "remove ghosts" if the image has moving objects. Then click OK.


    # An HDR image will be created. Save it for future usage. I recommend saving it as Radiance (.HDR) format. Then starts the real part.. tone mapping. Go to Image > Mode > 16 bits/channel. You could've chosen 8 bit/channel, but that way you will have smaller file size at the expense of image data.


    # A new box will open letting you adjust the look of your photo. Use Local Adaptation for maximum flexibility. The options speak for themselves and thus, is up to you to experiment with and get the result you want. When you are satisfied with the results, click OK to get the processed image.


    # You are almost done. You may want to reduce the noise generated in the process or sharpen the photo, it is all up to you. In some cases, you may have to tone map the same HDR image using different settings and paste them in a new file as layers. Then mask out the unwanted parts and adjust the opacity of each layer to get a "hybrid" tone mapped image. It requires a bit advanced skill in Photoshop. So, if you did not understand this point, skip it. You will surely do when you become a bit more skilled.

    Save the image as whatever format you want.
    Photomatix: I have used Photomatix Pro 3.2 for this tutorial:
    # Run Photmatix. I recommend reading the tutorial included with the program. It will help you understand things easily. Then click Generate HDR image.


    # In the box that opens next, click on Browse.


    # Locate and select all of the images and click Open.


    # It should show the file names. Click on OK.


    # The settings are easy to understand, and does what they mean. More info available in the built-in tutorial. Choose them according to your image. You may always use the following settings for most of the images.


    # The HDR image will be generated. When the process is complete, click on Tone Mapping.


    # Make sure you have Details Enhancer tab active. The terms are a bit technical here, so take the help of the tutorial included. Toy with the settings to get the best result. Click on Process to start processing the image.

    # You are done.

    Save the image as whatever format you want. You can also take the image to Photoshop for post processing. You may also use the Photomatix plug-in for Photoshop for tone mapping instead of the standalone version.

    Example


    I have used 5 different exposures for this tutorial. They are -1/0/+1/+2/+3. I have used a normal point and shoot camera. If you have a DSLR, you are likely to get better results.


    Although the main objective of HDR images is to bring out the details to make the image look "realistic", some people love more aggressive tone mapping. Some love those overdone images, some hate them. It's your call. If you want it to be realistic, you can do that. But when you decide to exaggerate the image, it will become somewhat artistic. An example will clarify this. Here is the 0 EV photo to the left, realistically tone mapped in the middle and overdone to the right.


    Here are a few other examples that you might want to check out as well:
    Another example showing 0 EV photo to the left, realistically tone mapped in the middle and overdone to the right.


    Here is a late afternoon sky, -1 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.


    Beautiful sky after raining, 0 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.


    A sunny and somewhat cloudy noon. Notice recovered details on the white building and the cloud. +1 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.


    Here is a sunset scene. 0 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right. See how much detail is recovered.


    Here comes the overdone images. 0 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.


    Another aggressively tone mapped and color graded example. 0 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.

    Like both the realistic and overdone ones? Then why not mix these two? 0 EV photo to the left, tone mapped one to the right.


    Thank you for reading. I hope you will be able to shoot photos in High Dynamic Range from now on. Whenever you get time, read more about the topics and practice with different scenes. HDR is the future of photography, and you should be prepared.

    One example of bracketed exposures is attached with this post for you to experiment with.

    You may want to post your comments here if you want.

    Bracket.zip
    Last edited by proton_chain; May 17th, 2011 at 12:10. Reason: More examples added


  2. #2

    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    What a big post!

    + Rep.

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    I tried to shorten it as much as possible. But if I shorten it even more, a beginner will have unanswered questions.


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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    perfect combo... just what i wanna say...
    খাই-দাই গান গাই, তাইরে নাইরে না!

  5. #5

    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by proton_chain View Post
    I tried to shorten it as much as possible. But if I shorten it even more, a beginner will have unanswered questions.
    Man, I was joking, don't take it seriously.

    Btw, excellent post, double rep. given!

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by Rion View Post
    Man, I was joking, don't take it seriously.

    Btw, excellent post, double rep. given!
    I understand, I too think the post is too big to scroll.

    Thanks for the rep(s), much appreciated.


  7. #7

    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by proton_chain View Post
    I understand, I too think the post is too big to scroll.

    Thanks for the rep(s), much appreciated.
    To be really honest, this one is one of the best post I've seen in BG, IMO. So, giving rep. thrice isn't something big for this kind of work. Keep up the pace, PC!

    Reputation given tripple time.
    Last edited by Leaving BG; September 22nd, 2010 at 20:29.

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    ahh!! HDR
    here are some pictures, photos from Dhaka Motor Show 2010.







    @regarding Photomatix, if you don't register Photomatx, It'll show an irritating watermark in the middle.
    Last edited by Hamilton; September 22nd, 2010 at 20:36.

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by StoryTE||ER View Post
    ahh!! HDR
    here are some pictures, photos from Dhaka Motor Show 2010.
    @regarding Photomatix, if you don't register Photomatx, It'll show an irritating watermark in the middle.
    Whoo! All of them are overdone! The top one looks excellent and artistic. All of them, especially the third one has very high noise in the bottom left corner and the girl's back (left). You could've used a noise reduction software to get rid of that. And why not post a somewhat "realistic" picture so that we could see what actually happened in the Motor Show?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rion View Post
    To be really honest, this one is one of the best post I've seen in BG, IMO. So, giving rep. thrice isn't something big for this kind of work. Keep up the pace, PC!

    Reputation given tripple time.
    Thank you so much.
    Last edited by proton_chain; September 22nd, 2010 at 20:43.


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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by proton_chain View Post
    Whoo! All of them are overdone! The top one looks excellent and artistic. All of them, especially the third one has very high noise in the bottom left corner and the girl's back (left). You could've used a noise reduction software to get rid of that. And why not post a somewhat "realistic" picture so that we could see what actually happened in the Motor Show?
    lol man, tbh, I didn't do it hehehe XD
    And there are hell lots of photos from Dhaka Motor Show, don't have much time i can post some HDR'd images here if you want that it

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    nice tutorail man thnx


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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Didn't notice before Proton Chain. Nice work. And agree with Rion. This is one of the best post in BG ever. So 4 ta repu.

    Like my Facebook page Gaming Newz for new gaming news updates.

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by anik_lc View Post
    Didn't notice before Proton Chain. Nice work. And agree with Rion. This is one of the best post in BG ever. So 4 ta repu.
    Thank you very much, its my pleasure


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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    Quote Originally Posted by proton_chain View Post
    Thank you very much, its my pleasure
    Effin awsum sig bhaiya :O! Beshi Awsum

  15. #15

    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    ~Awesome stuff .. i was kinda lookin for a thread to convert my images to HDR .. its one supercool thing when u work on pics wich needs blurs/motion blurs... it really does bring out real quality of ur visual =D~

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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    such a nice post @proton_chain ...

  17. #17
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    Default Re: High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDRI) - A guide for beginners

    r a ai post ta aage kgeyal kori nai.. @proton_chain awesome post man! time niye porte boshbo...

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